| contemporary drawing |

Drawings & Notes

1 February 2023
drawing Willem de Kooning Untitled, 1959 Ink on paper - drawings, contemporary drawing, work on paper, contemporary art, art on paper

Willem de Kooning

Untitled, 1959
Ink on paper
99.7 x 69.8 cm

Roma New York 1953 – 1964
Including: Afro, Carla Accardi, Franco Angeli, Luigi Boille, Alberto Burri, Giuseppe Capogrossi, Piero Dorazio, Tano Festa, Giosetta Fioroni, Philip Guston, Franz Kline, Willem de Kooning, Jannis Kounellis, Conrad Marca-Relli , Gastone Novelli, Achille Perilli, Robert Rauschenberg, Mimmo Rotella, Salvatore Scarpitta, Mario Schifano, Toti Scialoja, Mark Tobey, Cy Twombly
12 January – 25 February 2023
David Zwirner Gallery, New York

Giosetta Fioroni

Ragazza sovietica, 1969
Pencil and enamel on paper on canvas
179.1 x 140.3 cm

Cy Twombly

Sperlonga drawing, 1959
Oil-based house paint, pencil, and wax crayon on paper
69.9 x 100 cm

Mario Schifano

No. 2 dagli Archivi del Futurismo, 1965
Enamel and graphite on canvas
160.3 x 114.9 cm

29 January 2023

Berlinde De Bruyckere

It almost seemed a lily, 2019-2022
Tracing paper and thread on paper
44.8 x 28 cm

Berlinde De BruyckereA simple prophecy
26 January – 13 May 2023
Hauser & Wirth, Zürich

Berlinde De Bruyckere
It almost seemed a lily, 2019-2022
Tracing paper and thread on paper
44.8 x 28 cm

Berlinde De Bruyckere
It almost seemed a lily, 2019-2022
Tracing paper and thread on paper
44.8 x 28 cm

25 January 2023

Carroll Dunham

Wrestler Profile (5), 2014
water soluble crayon and pencil on paper
76.5 x 56.5 cm

Carroll Durham. Selected Drawings
25 January – 25 February 2023
Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin

Carroll Dunham
Green Female, 2021
watercolour, water soluble crayon, watercolour pencil and pencil on paper
51 x 40 cm

Carroll Dunham
White Male Head Over Water, 2017
watercolour, water soluble crayon and pencil on paper
19.2 x 14.5 cm

[from the pressrelease]
To Carroll Dunham the act of drawing is both a routine and a cornerstone for all other media in his multidisciplinary approach. The focus of the show on works in this medium is therefore intimate and highly informative of his practice at large.

One of the leading artists of his generation, Dunham is celebrated for his independent and highly distinctive oeuvre. Across several decades, his work has evolved from anthropomorphic abstraction in the 1970s to a surreal universe inhabited by archetypal human figures. Dunham’s careful choreography provides insight into his subjects’ complex internal world. Riding the line between abstraction and figuration, planes of strong colour and the artist’s distinctive curvilinear line activate the energetically charged works.

The human body has been an ongoing primary subject in Dunham’s oeuvre. Including works from several prominent series of the past decade, a selection from Dunham’s celebrated ‘Wrestler’ series presents a male figure rendered in profile, contemplating his own reflection over a body of water, or wrestling with other male nudes in the landscape.

A mode for inventiveness and experimentation, drawing enables Dunham a raw and immediate pathway for his distinctive pictorial lexicon, without hierarchy towards painting. ‘There is no work of Carroll Dunham that doesn’t use drawing as a foundation. I wouldn’t even know what it would mean to make painting without drawing… I have always drawn a lot, I have always used drawing as a laboratory to think about other things.’

Carroll Dunham
White Male With Dog V, 2018
casein and graphite on paper
79 x 57 cm

22 January 2023

Bridget Riley

Study for Polarity, 1964
graphite and gouache on paper
46.7 x 40 cm 

Bridget Riley Drawings: From the Artist’s Studio
17 September  2022 – 16 January 2023
Art Institute of Chicago

4 February – 28 May 2023
Hammer Museum, Los Angeles

Bridget Riley
Egyptian Stripes with Revisions, 1983
gouache on graph paper

Bridget Riley
Study for Shuttle, 1964
gouache on graph paper
24.5 x 24.1 cm

Bridget Riley
Recollections of Scotland (2), 1959
conte crayon on paper

20 January 2023

René Daniels

Untitled, 1983
Ink on paper
54.4 x 46 cm

René DaniëlsWorks on paper
13 January – 25 February 2023
Modern Art, London

René Daniëls
Untitled, 1976
Ink and tape on paper
170 x 197.5 cm

René Daniëls
Untitled, n.d.
Watercolour on paper
47 x 40 cm

René Daniëls
Untitled (P.A.T.I.O.), 1986
Felt pen and ink on paper
40 x 47 cm

René Daniëls
Zal ik mijn stoel afzetten?, 1982
Watercolour, ink, chalk on paper
46.4 x 39.4 cm

17 January 2023

Günther Förg

Untitled, 1998
Acrylic on paper
148 x 100 cm

Günther FörgPeintures sur Canson
12 January – 4 March 2023
Gallery Lelong & Co., Paris

Günther Förg
Untitled, 1996
Acrylic on paper
148 x 100 cm

[from the pressrelease]

This new exhibition of Günther Förg (1952-2013) brings together an ensemble of twelve paintings on large sheets of Canson paper, made at the very end of the twentieth century (1996 – 2000). Most of them have never been on show before. Together, they suggest a kind of synopsis of several major artistic trends of the century that was then ending. Förg refused to be pigeon-holed into any artistic school or movement, whether abstract or figurative. He saw himself as a free artist who drew inspiration as much from observing reality around him as from the work of the major artists he admired. He considered painting on paper to be just as important as works on canvas. A previous exhibition at Galerie Lelong in 2015 displayed very large paper works from 1989-90.

This new grouping of works evokes – in an allusive and never ponderous manner – Ernst Wilhelm Nay or Nicolas de Staël, of Edvard Munch or Alberto Giacometti (the knee), as well as the artist’s own recurrent themes and structures such as grids and windows. Each of these works evinces the marvellous ease and accuracy that characterised the artist’s touch, the suppleness and liveliness of his brush. Ten years after his untimely death, his work has achieved a solid reputation internationally, a model of freedom that has become a point of reference and an inspiration for many young artists.

Günther Förg
Untitled, 1998
Acrylic on paper
148 x 100 cm

14 January 2023

Lynne Woods Turner

Untitled #9465, 2022
oil and pencil on linen over panel
25.40 x 20.32 cm

Vince Skelly and Lynne Woods Turner
10 December 2022 – 14 January 2023
Adams and Ollman, Portland

Lynne Woods Turner
Untitled #1047, 2013
pencil and colored pencil on Japanese paper
25.40 x 20.32 cm

Lynne Woods Turner
Untitled #9154, 2014
oil on linen over panel
40.64 x 33.02 cm

13 January 2023

Rebecca Horn

Im Inneren der Stadt, 2004
acrylic, pencil, and colored pencil on paper
81 1/2 x 69 x 1 3/4 inches (framed)

Rebecca Horn. Labyrinth of the Soul: Drawings 1965-2015
7 January – 18 February 2023
Sean Kelly, New York

Rebecca Horn
Am Kreuz, 2004
acrylic, pencil, and colored pencil on paper

[from the pressrelease]

Labyrinth of the Soul: Drawings 1965-2015 features fifty years of drawing by Rebecca Horn. It includes 55 works on paper and is the first dedicated exhibition exclusively to this aspect of Rebecca Horn’s practice, and the most extensive presentation of her work in the United States since her major retrospective at the Guggenheim Museum, New York, in 1993, curated by Germano Celant. From her earliest stages as an artist, drawing has been foundational and informed every aspect of Horn’s multi-faceted oeuvre, ranging from performances, which utilise bodily extensions, to feature films, poems, dynamic sculptures, and site-specific installations. Throughout her career, drawing has occupied a central role, with Horn working serially at different moments to create specific bodies of work, ranging from smaller, more intimate pieces to the later, large ‘Bodylandscape’ works on paper.

The earliest works in the exhibition, dating from the mid-1960s, evince Horn’s concern with the human form, bodily appendages, states of transformation, mechanisation, and machinery, making evident her dedication to the aesthetic form of performance. In 1968, Horn was hospitalised for a debilitating lung condition brought on by certain sculptural materials she was using. A subsequent period of convalescence at a sanitorium inspired a series of sculptures concerned with the body, isolation, and physical vulnerability. These themes became the artist’s subject, and her proposals for sculptures are documented in these early drawings. Other works, from the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s, demonstrate the myriad approaches Horn has taken to the form, with each cycle of drawings having a distinct tempo, like the cadence of the poetry or rhythm of the music that have continuously inspired her. For her smaller drawings, Horn often worked simultaneously across multiple sheets of paper laid out before her, adding marks and details as she moved delicately and quickly, fluttering across the paper’s surface like a butterfly, touching down on each sheet at various intervals to make her marks.

From around 2003-2015, Horn produced an impressive group of large-scale works referred to as ‘Bodylandscape’, paintings on paper that extended her interest in the body as machine into an autobiographical, performative arena. Incorporating pencil, acrylic, and watercolour and gouache with text, these energetic works are scaled to the artist’s own proportions, defined by the limit to which her arms could extend when building the sometimes-frenzied compositions through the movements and actions of her own body. Horn’s progression from attaching performative apparatus to her body in her early work, to creating mark producing automatons and sculptural machines, is synthesised in these stunning works, which replace the replicant machine with the body of the artist, bringing the arc of her career full circle. In 2015, Horn suffered a devastating stroke, which sadly left her unable to continue making drawings, resulting in these psychologically charged works being among the final and finest works on paper that she produced.

Rebecca Horn
Passing Through, 1988
pencil and colored pencil on paper
100 x 70 cm

9 January 2023

Arnulf Rainer

Selbstüberzeichnung (Overdrawing Self), 1969-1970
Oil, chalk on photograph
49.5 x 40 cm

Antonius Höckelmann | Arnulf Rainer
23 November 2022 – 11 February 2023
Michael Werner, New York

Antonius Höckelmann

Untitled, 1985
Pencil, pastel, gouache on paper
43 x 30.5 cm

Arnulf Rainer
Das andere Ufer (The Other Shore), n.d.
India ink, oil on photograph
60 x 50 cm

Antonius Höckelmann
Untitled, 1975
Wax crayon, gouache, pencil on paper
68 x 99.5 cm

Arnulf Rainer
Untitled (Chaotic Paintings), 1980-1983
Oil, watercolor on paper
45 x 62 cm

7 January 2023

Robert Longo

Study of After Mitchell; Bleu, bleu, le ciel bleu, 1961, 2022
Ink and charcoal on vellum
81.8 x 53 cm

Robert LongoThe New Beyond
17 October 2022 – 7 January 2023
Thaddaeus Ropac, Paris

Robert Longo
Untitled (After Soulages; Painting, 195 x 130 cm, May 1953; 1953), 2022
Charcoal on mounted paper
243.8 x 161.8 cm

[from the pressrelease]
American artist Robert Longo presents his most recent series of monumental charcoal drawings paying homage to the European pioneers of post-war art. Following his 2014 series of drawings based on American Abstract Expressionism, in this exhibition, Longo explores the work of Karel Appel, Sandra Blow, Jean Dubuffet, Sam Francis, Arshile Gorky, Hans Hartung, Hans Hofmann, Asger Jorn, Yves Klein, Willem de Kooning, Maria Lassnig, Piero Manzoni, Joan Mitchell, Pierre Soulages, Wols and Zao Wou-Ki. Transposing their disparate works into a large-scale format and shades of black and white, Longo brings together the different approaches of these painters to form a new, unified visual language (…)
The process of creating a charcoal drawing is almost entirely opposite to the process of creating a traditional painting. Starting with a white page, Longo gradually and meticulously darkens certain areas to create shadow, ending with the points of deepest black, whereas, in a traditional painting, highlights are applied at the end, over the darker tones. 
Where black and white photography tends to equalise darker shades of different colours, the artist also works to maintain the infinite nuances of the original colours in his shades of grey. Carefully analysing the colours of each original work, he carefully nuances his work to  distinguish what would originally have been a dark red from a dark blue (…)
Longo’s drawings are saturated with the time of their making. His approach is measured, even ‘forensic’. But as he studies every brushstroke, carefully recreating their material modulations and nuances of colour out of dry, black charcoal, he celebrates the materiality of paint that is, according to Font-Réaulx, ‘the sensitive and intimate meaning of these works’.
In this way, Longo not only establishes a dialogue between drawing and painting, but also calls into question the value systems of the art world, prompting us to revisit our relationship to images.

Robert Longo
Untitled (Nagasaki Bomb, 1945), 2022
Graphite and charcoal on paper
21.3 x 17.8 cm

Robert Longo
Untitled (After Appel; Amorous Dance, 1955), 2022
Charcoal on mounted paper
177.8 x 228.6 cm

Robert Longo
Study of After Hofmann; Laburnum, 1954, 2022
Ink and charcoal on vellum
53 x 66.2 cm

6 January 2023

Isa Genzken

Untitled, n.d. (ca. 1983)
pencil, ink, and watercolour on paper
61 x 43 cm

Isa GenzkenZeichnung Plan Collage 1965-2018
9 December 2022 – 18 February 2023
Galerie Buchholz, Köln

Isa Genzken
Untitled, n.d. (ca. 1983)
pencil and coloured pencil on paper
42 x 29,6 cm

Isa Genzken
Untitled (More Light Research), n.d. (ca. 1992)
lacquer on paper
29,7 x 42 cm

Isa Genzken
Untitled, n.d. (ca. 1981)
collage, photograph, ink, pencil on paper
38,7 x 23,9 cm

3 January 2023

Adrian Ghenie

Study for “Studio Scene 2” 2, 2022
Charcoal on paper
100 x 65 cm

Adrian GhenieThe Fear of Now
12 October 2022 – 10 January 2023
Thaddaeus Ropac, London

Adrian Ghenie
Study for “Studio Scene” 3, 2022
Charcoal on paper
100 x 65 cm

[from the pressrelease]
Adrian Ghenie employs a new drawing technique to construct the complex compositions of his figurative works. He applies charcoal to a paper primed for use with oil paint, which allows him to lay down, erase and rework his mark making. He is able to ‘rehearse’ his paintings through these preparatory studies ‘without the stress of being precise’, enacting what he describes as a ‘drawing based on mistakes’.

This innovative drawing technique informs new developments in Ghenie’s painting practice. Earlier works are characterised by thick impasto and gestural swathes of paint applied with a palette knife. In contrast, the recent works take a more linear approach as the medium is applied thinly with a small brush. He compares these works to ‘coloured drawings’, collapsing clear distinctions between mediums in a style evocative of the figurative works of Austrian artist Egon Schiele.

1 January 2023

David Shrigley

Untitled (I Like It), 2022
acrylic on paper
55 x 55 cm

David Shrigley. Proposals for Record Covers
3 December 2022 – 28 January 2023
Galerie Francesca Pia, Zürich

David Shrigley
Untitled (I Still See Him When I Close My Eyes), 2022
acrylic on paper
55 x 55 cm

[from the pressrelease]
Shrigley’s oeuvre includes classical artistic media such as drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, video, and installation, among others, as well as the publication of numerous books, cartoons for newspapers, his own merchandising products, and the design of record covers. Thus, the exhibition’s title Proposals for Record Covers can also be understood as a reference to his own navigation between the art world— in the narrower sense—and a more commercial context, whereby one does not exclude the other. Instead, these different spheres enrich each other. At the same time, the title can also be understood as an absurd task that does not seek fulfilment.
Formally, the fifty new paintings on display—all acrylic on paper—in fact resemble oversized record covers. They are square, and the subjects are usually depicted frontally and centered; they take up a large part of the surface and are compelling in their reserved colourfulness, which strongly stand out against the background, which is always white. In terms of content, the works are based on the humorous image-text combinations for which Shrigley has become known, particularly in the context of his drawings. These range from obvious tautologies, as in Untitled (Centre Parting) and his surprising health tips as in Untitled (Cigarettes Are Good for You, in a Way) or negotiate strange fears as in Untitled (Red Guitar, Do Not Be Afraid of It), to mention only a few examples.
In these paintings, Shrigley manages to reduce his ideas to the absolute minimum in order to communicate as simply and directly as possible. In combination with his dry, often biting humour, Shrigley’s works address banalities and shortcomings of everyday life, society and the state of the world, in order to demonstrate just how valuable humour is as a means of healthy detachment, especially in times like ours.

David Shrigley
Untitled (Here), 2022
acrylic on paper
55 x 55 cm

David Shrigley
Untitled (Punk Cannot Be Created or Destroyed), 2022
acrylic on paper
55 x 55 cm

30 December 2022

Dashiell Manley

letters I. E.W.A.T.I.F.A.B.E.T.W.S.T.U.W.W.W.K.I.B.A.I.W.L.O.M.B.W.W.L.T.T.H.I., 2022
Gouache, acrylic, graphite, chalk, pastel, newspaper, and oil stick on linen
3 panels, each: 99.1 x 81.3 cm
Overall: 99.1 x 243.8 cm

Dashiell ManleyModel _______
16 November 2022 – 7 January 7 2023
Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York

Dashiell Manley
[detail] letters I. E.W.A.T.I.F.A.B.E.T.W.S.T.U.W.W.W.K.I.B.A.I.W.L.O.M.B.W.W.L.T.T.H.I., 2022
Gouache, acrylic, graphite, chalk, pastel, newspaper, and oil stick on linen
3 panels, each: 99.1 x 81.3 cm
Overall: 99.1 x 243.8 cm

Dashiell Manley
detachments. argument; who’s next?, 2022
Gouache, acrylic, graphite and oil stick on linen
121.9 x 152.4 cm

23 December 2022

André Butzer

Untitled (Todes-Blei), 2001
Ink on paper
29.7 x 21 cm

André ButzerThüringer Wald (Works on Paper 2001–2022)
5 November 2022 – 7 January 2023
Nino Mier Gallery

André Butzer
Untitled, 2002
Watercolor and pencil on paper
48.2 x 66 cm

[from the pressrelease]
Thüringer Wald (Works on Paper 2001–2022) is a survey of the past two decades. This selection of works on paper captures the full expressive diversity of André Butzer’s practice. The formal range present in these works, reflects his thematic interest in the opposing poles of modernity: its horrors, particularly those of 20th century Germany, and its wonders. 

Figuration and abstraction always are one upon Butzer’s highly chromatic and solidified picture planes. Certain images and forms repeat across the papers in circuits. Works containing tangles of scribbles or intersecting bands of color lay bare the apparatus of representation. Other works appropriate pinnacles of painterly representation—like a reproductions of Raphael’s famous self-portrait, inscribed with a large, red N for Butzer’s utopian place in space that is his NASAHEIM.  

Regarding Butzer’s works on paper, Gwen Allen, professor of art history and director of the School of Art at San Francisco State University, writes: “As a draftsman, Butzer is as fiercely uninhibited as he is a painter, employing a vast repertoire of linear expression […]. If, at the dawn of modernist abstraction, such expressive license served as a foil to the mechanization of the industrial age, Butzer’s drawings prompt us to consider what such properties might signify today, in our own post-industrial—and increasingly post-human—era.” 

André Butzer
Untitled, 2019
Pencil on paper
54.6 x 35.6 cm

André Butzer
Untitled (ALL! ALL!), 2019
Watercolor, crayon, and pencil on paper
35.6 x 27.9 cm

19 December 2022

Stanley Whitney

Untitled, 2020
gouache on paper
55.9 x 76.2 cm

Stanley WhitneyPaintings on Paper
19 December 2022 – 23 January 2023
Gagosian, Gstaad

Stanley Whitney
Untitled, 2016
gouache on paper
55.9 x 77.5

[from the pressrelease]

Whitney’s paintings imbue loose “stacked” compositions with dynamic and unpredictable rhythms of color and space. Inspired by sources as diverse as experimental jazz and American quilt making, he marshals energetically brushed blocks and bars of pigment distinguished by transparency and tension wherever they intersect. Having worked in an abstract mode since the 1970s, he consolidated his current approach in the early 1990s during time spent in Italy. There, captivated by the effect of light on the façades of ancient Roman buildings such as the Colosseum and Palazzo Farnese, he achieved a new understanding of the relationship between color and geometry.

In the gouaches on view in Gstaad, which were made over a seven-year period, Whitney translates the square format of his large-scale canvas paintings to smaller works on paper. These compositions reveal the consistency of structure that undergirds his ostensibly spontaneous project. Far from being mere studies, they are robust independent undertakings in which the artist discovers new possibilities. Like other greats of abstract painting such as Ad Reinhardt and Al Taylor, Whitney takes the simplicity and flexibility of his medium and support as starting points from which to further extend his visual and atmospheric range.

Allowing the surface and tone of the paper to introduce texture and white space into his compositions, Whitney orchestrates a figure/ground interplay that is absent from his canvases, in which paint accounts for the works’ entire coloration and fully covers their supports. At certain moments the works’ stacked “parcels” of color bleed into one another, or into the bars that divide them horizontally, while at others they remain distinct. Throughout, however, the untouched surface of the paper intervenes to become a compositional element. This shift allows the grid to emerge here with especial clarity; it also makes apparent the point at which that structure disintegrates, transforming itself into something new.

Gouache, a water-based matte paint composed of ground pigments and plant-based binders, has a notable opacity derived from the addition of white fillers, such as clay or chalk, or a high pigment content. While making striking use of the medium’s color saturation, Whitney also dilutes his paint to give the application a translucent luminosity more often associated with watercolor. The resultant works have a distinctive mottled surface and blushing tint that, as is the case with their oil-on-canvas counterparts, recalls Whitney’s Roman inspiration through an active interplay of extemporaneity and design.

Stanley Whitney
Untitled, 2018
gouache on paper
55.9 x 76.2 cm

18 December 2022

Thomas Elshuis

HVV #012, 2021
(press)ink and tipp-ex on newspaper in wooden frame
71,5 x 53,5 x 4 cm

Thomas ElshuisHet Vrije Volk
We Like Art, Amsterdam

Thomas Elshuis
HVV #009
, 2021
(press)ink and tipp-ex on newspaper in wooden frame
71,5 x 53,5 x 4 cm

Thomas Elshuis
HVV #013, 2021
(press)ink and tipp-ex on newspaper in wooden frame
71,5 x 53,5 x 4 cm

Thomas Elshuis
HVV #008, 2021
(press)ink and tipp-ex on newspaper in wooden frame
71,5 x 53,5 x 4 cm

16 December 2022

Sara Issakharian

Tripped Trick, 2022
Ink, colour pencil, pastel, watercolour on paper
56.2×74.6 cm

Sara Issakharian. Behold mother, I make all things new
22 November –  17 December 2022
Tanya Leighton, Berlin

Sara Issakharian
WLF, 2022
Ink, colour pencil, pastel, watercolour on paper
56.8×67.3 cm

Sara Issakharian
Here and Then There and Now, 2022
Ink, colour pencil, pastel, watercolour on paper
151.5×200.3 cm

7 December 2022

Hans op de Beeck

Dandelion Clock (study), 2022
black-and-white watercolour on Arches paper
59.4 x 49 cm

Hans op de BeeckWorks on Paper
26 November – 31 December 2022
Gallery Ron Mandos, Amsterdam

Hans op de Beeck
Winter Road (study), 2022
black-and-white watercolour on Arches paper
81 x 100 cm

Hans op de Beeck
The Pond, Last Winter, 2022
black-and-white watercolour on arches paper
130 x 290 cm

[from the pressrelease]
In 2009, Op de Beeck exhibited at Rome’s historic Galleria Borghese. In dialogue with the old masters from the collection, he developed six expansive monochrome watercolours. Today, these paintings exist as part of the MAXXI (Museum of Contemporary Art, Rome) permanent collection. Since then, Op de Beeck has worked prolifically on continuing this series – a steadily growing oeuvre of watercolours. Though fully matured and autonomous works in their own right, they have evolved into a kind of picture-book, an ever-expanding universe of images.

Op de Beeck’s watercolours envisage fictional places – within these spaces dark and fairy-like characters emerge in nocturnal settings. These enigmas elicit a sense of alienation and melancholy, whilst radiating peace and tranquility in equal measure. The figures and places offer seeds for the audience to create a story.

Each of the works is painted at night, alone in a silent studio. Here, without interruption the creative process becomes one of being intoxicated with timelessness. Just as in a dream, the process is one of accessing the subconscious – a ritual of surrender to the unknown. Op de Beeck wrestles with the growing pains and obstacles of the human condition. Here, the futility of man in the face of the sublime and the natural world becomes his point of departure (…)

Op de Beeck often balances the gentle and idyllic with the disturbing and dark. Notions of mystery, the unexplainable and the fundamental loneliness of our existence recur regularly. Alongside, we see other subtly recurring motifs – still lives of banal objects as memento mori; or the micro-poetry of raindrops on water and soap bubbles floating languidly by.

Hans op de Beeck
Vanitas (flowers and soap bubbles), 2022
black-and-white watercolour on Arches Paper
118 x 147 cm

22 November 2022

Guy Vording

Black Pages VI: An Abiding Affection, 2022
aquarel pencil on paper
76 x 57 cm

Guy Vording en Stefan Serneels. Fear isn’t so difficult to understand
21 October – 26 November 2022
galerie dudokdegroot, Amsterdam

Guy Vording
Black Pages III: One was badly hurt, 2022
Aquarel pencil on paper
39 x 30 cm

Guy Vording
Black Pages VI: To another Life, 2022
Aquarel pencil on paper
40 x 57 cm

17 November 2022

Daniel Jensen

Shipwrecked, 2022
Soft pastel, Graphite and Gesso on canvas
140 x 100 cm

Daniel JensenHover on the Edge of Sleep
17 November – 18 December 2022
Alzueta Gallery, Madrid

Daniel Jensen
Tunnel Vision, 2022
Charcoal, soft pastel and gesso on canvas
140 × 100 cm

Daniel Jensen
Untitled, 2022
Soft pastel, charcoal acrylic and varnish on canvas
180 × 130 cm

10 November 2022

Jockum Nordström

Ek (Oak), 2022
watercolour and collage on paper
109 x 76,5 cm

Jockum Nordström. Wishing Well
9 November – 17 December 2022
Zeno X Gallery, Antwerpen

Jockum Nordström
Suset i skogen (Wind in the Forest), 2022
watercolour and collage on paper
77 x 91 cm

Jockum Nordström
Nattljus (Night Light), 2022
watercolour on paper
99 x 69 cm

Jockum Nordström
Skafferi (Pantry), 2022
pencil on paper
48 x 64 cm

6 November 2022

Mounira Al Solh

13 April, 13 April, 13 April, 2022
Ink, blood, pastels, charcoal and watercolour on paper
56,4 x 42 cm

Mounira Al Solh
13 April, 13 April, 13 April, 2022
Ink, blood, pastels, charcoal and watercolour on paper
29,5 x 41,4 cm

Mounira Al Solh
I strongly believe in our right to be frivolous #180
, 2012 –
mixed media drawing on legal paper
28.6 x 21 cm

4 November 2022

Charmaine Watkiss

Double Consciousness: Be Aware of One’s Intentions, 2021
Graphite, pencil, watercolour and ink on paper
76 x 56 cm

Charmaine Watkiss
The Hidden Presence, 2021
Graphite, watercolour and ink on paper
29.7 x 21 cm

Charmaine Watkiss
Amplified perception
, 2021
Pencil, graphite, watercolour and ink on paper
88 x 66cm

29 October 2022

Margarita Gluzberg

Pink-Violet 1960 Mix, 2022
Pastel and graphite pencil on canvas
186 x 165 cm

Margarita Gluzberg Proper Time
20 October – 19 November 2022
Karsten Schubert, London

Margarita Gluzberg
Glass 1950 Mix, 2022
Colour and graphite pencil on paper
78 x 56 cm

Margarita Gluzberg
Ground-Green 1960/80 Mix, 2022
Pastel on canvas
200 x 166 cm

29 October 2022

General Idea

Untitled, 1992
Collage, found offset on paper, watercolor, and gouache on sketchbook paper
35.5 x 26.5 cm

Ecce Homo: The Drawings of General Idea [AA Bronson, Felix Partz and Jorge Zontal]
7 October 2022 – 15 January 2023
The Drawing Center, New York

General Idea
Untitled, 1985
Felt pen, gouache, graphite, and acrylic on sketchbook paper
27.8 x 20.3 cm

[from the pressrelease]
Living and working together as part of the Toronto arts and theater community, AA Bronson (b. Michael Tims, 1946, Vancouver), Felix Partz (b. Ronald Gabe, 1945, Winnipeg; d. 1994), and Jorge Zontal (b. Slobodan Saia-Levy, 1944, Parma, Italy; d. 1994) formalized their collaboration in 1969 into a single entity known as General Idea. From their earliest projects like the staging of The 1970 Miss General Idea Pageant to their late activist initiatives around the AIDS crisis (among their most famous projects is the 1983 re-envisioning of Robert Indiana’s LOVE print as a memetic icon referencing the recently-named syndrome), General Idea explored multimedia, conceptual, and performance work as a tool for engaging with common culture and its repressions.

Less well-known are the drawings authored by General Idea between 1985 and 1993, which The Drawing Center, in partnership with Musée d’art moderne et contemporain Geneva (MAMCO), will bring together for the first time in the United States, and again in Geneva in February 2023. Investigating motifs in the group’s multimedia works such as poodles, stiletto heels, masks, heraldry, and metamorphosed genitalia, these drawings were primarily produced by Jorge Zontal during group meetings. However, given General Idea’s mandate for co-authorship, as well as the circumstances under which they were executed, the drawings are considered to be collaborative. Although they are done entirely by hand, the repetition of specific motifs follows a viral logic that is akin to General Idea’s own penchant for mass reproduction. Seen together, these drawings are a fascinating window into General Idea’s distinct artistic vision as well as their unique notions of collaboration and co-authorship.

General Idea
Untitled, 1992
Watercolor and gouache on sketchbook paper
35 x 26.5 cm

20 October 2022

Karl Haendel

Father Tranquilino “Jun” de Ocampo, Katholische Kirchengemeinde Heilig Geist, 2022
Pencil on paper
261 x 213 cm

Karl HaendelPraise Berlin
17 September – 22 October 2022
Wentrup Gallery, Berlin

Karl Haendel
Iman Said Ahmed Arif, Khadija Mosque, 2022
Pencil on paper
261 x 213 cm

Karl Haendel
Imam Seyran Ates, Ibn Rushd-Goethe Mosque, Berlin, 2022
Pencil on paper
261 x 213 cm

[from the pressrelease]
In a series of large-scale, realistic drawings depicting the hands of some of the city’s most inspiring Buddhist, Christian, Hindu, Jewish or Muslim leaders, Haendel pays homage to a diverse group of pastors, imams, rabbis and priests. As much this project is about religious diversity, it is also about ethnic and racial diversity. Berlin is growing more diverse as immigrants arrive. Besides its Catholic and protestant residents, there is large Muslim population, growing communities of Buddhists and Hindus, and a small but vibrant community of Jews. Highlighting how these communities of believers are vibrant, welcoming, and tolerant, the artist hopes to provide space for viewers to reassess their own systems of belief, embrace complexity, and expand their acceptance.
In the past two years I have been exploring the idea of group portraiture through the representation of hands. It is a novel way to make a portrait, allowing people to express themselves with gesture and nuance, but free from the tropes and standards of beauty associated with traditional representational portraiture. And in a time of pandemic when touching isn’t allowed, representing the hand seems only more interesting to me. The hands of religious leaders, as they pray or perform blessings or rituals, are filled with spiritual resonance, further compelling my interest in a time when faith in is short supply. And art across culture and time, from the hands of saints in Byzantine mosaics, to Buddha’s gestures in bronze sculpture, through to the mudras in Hindu iconography, have been filled with depictions of hands. This project continues that tradition, but with an emphasis on interfaith dialog and diversity. (Karl Haendel)
To make the work, the artist met with each leader in their house of worship, to talk about their faith, the history of their congregation in the city and to take reference photos of their hands. Back at his studio, Haendel digitally manipulated these photos to create new and often physically impossible hand compositions–contemporary reinterpretations of ritualistic hand gestures found in imagery across art history. But the digital affect is left imperceptibly visible (the same hand holding itself or a hand with too few or too many fingers), reminding us that these mystical and uncanny appendages are of the present. With these digital renderings used for reference, Haendel drew each hand portrait in pencil on paper, slowly and meticulously, at very large scale. In doing so, the artist uses his hand and labor to honor each leader’s labor, be it intellectual or as service to their community, as a kind of homage, expanding the definition of drawing to include ritual, meditation, and service.

18 October 2022

Janaina Tschäpe

Untitled (Portrait), 2022
Watercolor pencil on paper
87 × 67 × 4 cm

Janaina Tschäpe. Wandelstern
24 August – 22 October 2022
Galleri Bo Bjergaard

Janaina Tschäpe
Regenspiel, 2022
Watercolor and watercolor crayon on paper
110 × 158 cm

Janaina Tschäpe
Untitled (Portrait), 2022
Watercolor, watercolor crayon, colored pencil on paper
87 cm x 67 cm x 4 cm

Janaina Tschäpe
Colorfield Drawing VI, 2022
Watercolor and pencil on paper
113 cm x 162 cm

16 October 2022

Simon Schubert

Untitled (Licht durch Vorhang), 2022
graphite on paper
100 x 70 cm

Simon SchubertThe Architecture of Shadows
2 September – 29 October 2022
Martin Kudlek Gallery, Cologne

Simon Schubert
Untitled (schwarzes Loch), 2022
graphite on paper
138,5 x 108,5 cm

[from the pressrelease]
In the exhibition “The Architecture of Shadows” Simon Schubert shows new graphite drawings and a new group of sculptures, which can be defined as a continuation of his previous thematic and technical ways of working. The drawings and sculptures fit into Schubert’s ongoing project of constructing an imaginary building, which grows with each exhibition and artwork, and on which the artist has been working for many years. In “The Architecture of Shadows” the exhibited pieces expand the artist’s project with new views and interiors.
With his new works Simon Schubert studies aspects of different light phenomena, which have an impact on the perception of surfaces and spaces. At the same time, these works induce the reflection of questions about the lucidity and opacity of perceived phenomena on a metaphysical level.
Although the representational and technical elaboration of the chosen motifs prominently draws attention, the works do not solely focus physical effects. Rather the pieces emphasize the relational process of immanent and transcendent experience, by referring beyond the visual interplay of light and shadow and passages within in interiors.

Simon Schubert
Untitled (Drei Fenster), 2022
graphite on paper
100 x 70 cm

11 October 2022

William Kentridge

The Moment Has Gone, 2022
Indian ink, Collage and Pencil on Phumani handmade paper, mounted on raw canvas
Work: 192.2 x 191 cm

William KentridgeOh To Believe in Another World
1 October – 12 November 2022
Goodman Gallery, London

William Kentridge
The Great Yes (Studio Still Life), 2022
Indian ink, Pencil and collage on Phumani handmade paper mounted onto raw canvas
Work (pre-mounted): 171 x 239 cm

William Kentridge
Untitled (Tree II), 2022
Indian Ink on Phumani handmade paper
118 x 166.5 cm

8 October 2022

Susan Schwalb

Parchment XVIII, 1982
Copperpoint, fire, wax & smoke on clay coated paper
30.5 x 23 cm

Still Masters II
Minjung KimDavid ConnearnSusan Schwalb
28 September – 05 November 2022
Patrick Heide Contemporary Art

David Connearn

Square root 2, 2022
A drawing of 566 lines using the initial digits of the numerical expression of √2
Drawn with the iso 128 series of pens / Black ink on 350 gsm Somerset Satin paper
84.1 x 84.1 cm

Minjung Kim

The Corner (18-001), 2018
Mixed media on mulberry Hanji paper
200 x 139 cm

5 October 2022

Pélagie Gbaguidi

Care, 2020
dry pastel and wool on paper
21 x 29 cm

40 YEARS of Zeno X Gallery – the two-thousands
[with: N. Dash, Jan De Maesschalck, Pélagie Gbaguidi, Kees Goudzwaard, Susan Hartnett, Yun-Fei Ji, Kim Jones Naoto Kawahara, Martin Margiela, Philip Metten, Paulo Monteiro, Jockum Nordström, Marina Rheingantz, Pietro Roccasalva, Grace Schwindt, Jenny Scobel, Hyun-Sook Song, Bart Stolle, Mircea Suciu, Jack Whitten]
24 September – 12 October 2022
Zeno X Gallery, Antwerpen

Susan Hartnett

Oct. 11 2011 #2, Blue-joint grass (Calamagrostis canadensis), 2011
charcoal on paper
56,5 x 76 cm

Jockum Nordström

Cat Dog Cat, 2016
collage, watercolour and graphite on paper
40 x 50 cm

1 October 2022

Louise Bourgeois

Orbits and Gravity, 2009
Watercolor, ink, pencil and etching on paper
14 x 24.1 cm

Louise BourgeoisDrawing Intimacy 1939 – 2010
1 October 2022 – 2 January 2023
Hauser & Wirth Gallery

Louise Bourgeois
Les Petites Fleurs
, 2007
Watercolor, gouache, colored pencil and etching on paper
30.5 x 21 cm

Louise Bourgeois
La Fleur Bleue, 2007
Watercolor, pencil and etching on paper
20.6 x 28.9 cm

8 September 2022

Mark Manders

Untitled Drawing, 2011-2022
Pencil on paper
59 × 42 cm

Mark Manders
3 September – 15 October 2022
Zeno X Gallery, Antwerpen

Mark Manders
Cloud Study (with All Existing Words), 2005-2022
Offset print and acrylic on paper, chicken wire, wood
71 × 52 × 4 cm

Mark Manders
Drawing with Six Drops of Rain / Drawing with Vanishing Point, 2020-2022
Pencil on paper
65 × 50 cm

6 September 2022

Peppi Bottrop

Sprgs, 2022
Coal, graphite, acrylic and flame soot on canvas
140 x 90 cm

Peppi Bottrop. Dream On
3 September – 15 October 2022
Sies + Höke, Düsseldorf

Peppi Bottrop
Untitled, 2022
Coal and graphite on paper
59,2 x 42 cm

Peppi Bottrop
Drpwrt Hmlck wtr, 2022
Coal, graphite, acrylic and flame soot on canvas
185 x 150 cm

23 August 2022

Felipe Baeza

Wayward, 2021
ink, cut paper, graphite, twine, and acrylic collaged on paper
167.6 × 121.9 cm

Felipe Baeza
The 59th Venice Biennale: The Milk of Dreams
23 April – 27 November 2022 | Venice, Italy

Felipe Baeza
Fragments, refusing totality and wholeness, 2021
ink, embroidery, acrylic, graphite, varnish, and cut paper on panel
40.6 × 30.5 cm

[from the pressrelease] I open against my will dreaming of other planets I am dreaming of other ways of seeing this life These lines title a large-scale painting by Felipe Baeza, who combines collage, mixed media, egg tempera, and printmaking to make heavily textured two- dimensional works. Dreams of other planets, of another life arise through bodies depicted in states of transformation – often half human, half flora. Full foliage bursts from human heads, overtakes torsos and limbs, and erotically vines its way in and out of desirous mouths. Baeza’s approach to material aligns with the concepts that underline his work. This is visible in the new works shown at the Biennale Arte 2022, a continuation of a series Baeza has developed since 2018. He builds up his figures with layer after layer on panel, canvas, and paper, then sanding, carving, and altering the elements within each composition. This intense material manipulation recharacterises traditional drawing and painting processes and, reflecting the artist’s experience of migration to the United States from Mexico and migration across the globe, express his intent to create “fugitive bodies.” Described by the artist as love letters, his paintings and collages are a form of imaginative self-portraiture and future building.

Felipe Baeza
Por caminos ignorados, por hendiduras secretas, por las misteriosas vetas de troncos recién cortados, 2020
ink, flashe, acrylic, varnish, twine, cut paper, and egg tempera on paper